Ham Radio Third Party Agreements

Find out who you can deal with third-party traffic with. Read more I`m in the U.S. and I plan to demonstrate HF from a group of unlicensed children and adults at a family event this weekend. I want the kids to explode first and foremost. I read part 97.115 and the list of third-party enterprise agreements on the ARRL website. But maybe some of you can help me get experience with GOTA (Field Day Get on the Air) or JOTA (Jamboree on the Air). What is the sound of a QSO with an unauthorized operator? I know I have to control the radio, but I could use some instructions on how these QSOs usually go. JOTA is a spectacular opportunity to introduce Scouts to amateur radio. For many, this will be their first exposure to the world of ham radio.

Some will become hams and enjoy their hobby for the rest of their lives. Some will even find the basis of a career in science and technology. Although Antarctica is contractually considered international, amateur broadcasters in Antarctica are often subject to reciprocal licensing requirements for the country under which the camp is under the flag. [12] Member States of the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT)[2] all share the same requirements for reciprocal licensing of amateur radio stations. Amateurs can operate from most European countries without the need for additional licences or authorisations. Section 97.111 of the Commission`s Regulation, 47 C.F.R. No. 97.111, authorizes an amateur station licensed by the FCC to exchange information with amateur countries in other countries, with the exception of a country whose administration has indicated that it does not allow such radio communication. There is currently no banned country.

47 C.F.R. 97.111, authorizes an amateur station licensed by the FCC to exchange messages with amateur transmitters in other countries, with the exception of those of a country whose administration has indicated that it opposes such radio communication. There is currently no banned country. Section 97.115 of the Commission`s rules, 47 C.F.R. No. 97.115, authorizes an amateur station regulated by the FCC to transmit a message from its control operator (first part) to another amateur station control operator (second party) on behalf of another person (third party). However, no amateur transmitter may send messages for third parties to a station in the jurisdiction of a foreign government whose administration has not reached an agreement with the United States to allow the use of amateur stations for the transmission of international communications on behalf of third parties. While most third-party traffic rules cover communications with amateurs in other countries, there is an important rule for third-party traffic in the United States.

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